Academics

Area Career Center University Academics

Advanced Mathematics

Advanced Manufacturing I Criminal Justice I Physics I
Algebra I Criminal Justice II Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry
Algebra II

Current Problems, Issues, and Events

Preparing for College and Careers
Anatomy and Physiology Digital Application and Responsibility Spanish
Biology I English 9 Spanish II
Biology II English 10 Speech
Chemistry I English 11

Technical Business Communication

Chemistry II Geometry Themes in Literature
College-Entrance Preparation Health Careers I Urban Affairs
Composition Health Wellness Education U.S. History
Computer Tech Support Physical Science World History & Civilization

Advanced Mathematics, Special Topics

Advanced Mathematics, Special Topics is the course title that is to be used for reporting by schools that offer mathematics course beyond the scope of approved courses. Schools must apply to the Indiana Department of Education for a non-standards course waiver. The non-standards course waiver will provide a proposed course description, standards students will meet for the course, how will the special topics course relates to students needs, and rational describing postsecondary/higher education and business/industry need and support for the course. Schools will follow the special topics non-standards course waiver framework and provide feedback to the Indiana Department of Education at the end of the course. 

    •Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra II or Integrated Mathematics III
    •Credits:  1 semester course, 1 credit per semester. May be offered for successive semesters 
    Counts as a Mathematics course for all diplomas

Advanced Manufacturing I

Advanced Manufacturing I is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in two broad areas: Industrial Technology/Software Controls and Manufacturing Trends. Industrial Technology and Software Controls covers wiring and schematic diagrams used to design, install, and repair electrical/electronic equipment such as wireless communication devices, programmable controllers. Course content will include basic theories of electricity, electronics, digital technology, and basic circuit analysis. Activities include experiences in: soldering; use of an oscilloscope, meters, signal generators and tracers; breadboarding; circuit simulation software; and troubleshooting. Understanding and using the underlying scientific principles related to electricity, electronics, circuits, sine waves, and Ohm’s Law are integral to this course. Manufacturing Trends covers basic concepts in manufacturing operations and plant floor layout in the production environment. Applications of Computer Numerical Control (CNC), and lathe and turning operations are developed as a foundation for machining operations. Coordinate system concepts are introduced as relevant to machining processes, as well as fluid and mechanical power, welding, and lean manufacturing. Fluid power concepts will include hydraulic components and circuits, laws and principles, fluid power controllers, and the construction of systems. In the mechanical power portion of the course, students will learn about machine specifications, basic forces, friction, simple machines, motors, and motor controls. Students will also be introduced to lean manufacturing where they will study concepts including: lean goals, product quality, eliminating waste, cost effectiveness, lean concepts, resource planning, continuous improvement, and the various advantages of lean manufacturing. This course includes MSSC concepts required to earn MSSC certification.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing
    •Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semester required, 1-3 credits per semester, maximum of 6 credits.
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General,Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Algebra I

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Nonlinear Equations; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; and Polynomial Expressions. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 8 - 9
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: A 2 credit course, 1 credit per semester
    Fulfills the Algebra I/Integrated Mathematics I requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas. Students pursuing Core 40, Core 40 with Academics Honors, or Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma should receive credit for Algebra I by the end of Grade 9

Algebra II

The Mathematics standards for Algebra II are made up of 5 strands: Complex Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Systems of Equations; Quadratic Equations and Functions; Exponential & Logarithmic Equations and Functions; Polynomial, Rational, and Other Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability. The skills listed in each strand indicate what students should know and be able to do in Algebra II.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: C or higher both semesters in Algebra I
    •Credits: A 2 credit course, 1 credit per semester
    Fulfills the Algebra II requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomasAnatomy and Physiology

This course is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of human biology. The material focuses on the interrelationships of structure and function, with an emphasis on muscles and the skeletal system. The course is useful for students intending to enter health occupations.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Passed Biology with C or higher
    •Credits: A two credit course
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas. Fulfills a Core 40 Science course requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective or Directed Elective for any diploma

Biology I

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by Indiana Department of Education 199 June 14, 2013 State Approved Course Titles & Descriptions High School theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 10
    •Recommended Prequisite: None
    •Credits: A two credit course
    Fulfills the life science requirement for the General diploma, Fulfills Biology credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Biology II

Biology II is an advanced laboratory, field, and literature investigations-based course. Students enrolled in Biology II examine in a greater depth the structures, functions, and processes of living organisms. Students also analyze and describe the relationship of Eathr's living organisms to each other and to the environment in which they live. In this course, students refine their scientific inquiry skills as they collaboratively and independently apply their knowledge of the unifying themes of biology and biological questions and problems related to personal and community issues in the life sciences.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 10
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Passed Biology with C or higher
    •Credits: A two credit course
    Fulfills the life science requirement for the General diploma, Fulfills Biology credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Chemistry I

This course introduces modern chemical theory and follows a qualitative approach to investigating the theories and principles of modern chemistry. Included are lectures, discussions, mathematical treatment of chemical theories, and lab work.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 10-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: C- or better in Biology and Algebra I
    •Credits: A two credit course
    Fulfills the Physical Science requirement for the General diploma, Fulfills Biology credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas. Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course.

Chemistry II

Chemistry II is an extended laboratory, field, and literature investations-based course. Students enrolled in Chemistry II examine the chemical reactions of matter in living and nonliving materials. Based on the unifying themes of chemistry and the application of physical and mathematical models of the interactions of matter, students use the methods of scientific inquiry to answer chemical questions and solve problems concerning personal needs and community issues related to chemistry.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: C or better in Chemistry I and Algebra II
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum 2 credit
    Counts as a Physical Science credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas. Qualifies as quantitative reasoning course.

College-Entrance Preparation

Utilizes individual student score reports from the PSAT, PLAN, and/or Accuplacer to prepare students for the SAT, ACT, Accuplacer and/or Compass college readiness assessments. Based on student score reports, students will receive targeted instruction to strenghten their foundations in critical reading, writing, mathematices, and science sections of college admission and placement exams. As appropriate, the course will also encompass test taking strategies to prepare students for success on a high-stakes assessment. Teachers are encouraged to use a curriculum with longitudinal, successful results. Course may also include college selection and application units, to better parepare students for overall college-readiness

    •Recommended Grade Level: semester 1-grade 11; semeser 2 - grade 10
    •Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra II (or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II)
    •Credits: 1 credit, 1 semester course
    Counts as an Elective credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Composition

A study and application of the retorical writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasian. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and reponses to literature.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: English 9 & 10, or teacher recommendation
    •Credits: 1 credit
    Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.

Computer Tech Support

Allows students to explore how computers work. Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. Through hands on activities and labs, students learn how to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisites: Information Communications and Technology
    •Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, maximum of 6 credits
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Criminal Justice I

Criminal Justice I Introduces specialized classroom and practical experiences related to public safety occupations such as law enforcement, loss prevention services, and homeland security. This course provides an introduction to the purposes, functions, and history of the three primary parts of the criminal justice system as well as an introduction to the investigative process. Oral and written communication skills should be reinforced through activities that model public relations and crime prevention efforts as well as the preparation of police reports

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisites: None
    •Credits: 2-3 credits per semester, maximum of 6 credits
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Criminal Justice II

Criminal Justice II introduces students to concepts and practices in controlling traffic as well as forensic investigation at crime scenes. Students will have opportunities to use mathematical skills in crash reconstruction and analysis activities requiring measurements and performance of speed/acceleration calculations. Additional activities simulating criminal investigations will be used to teach scientific knowledge related to anatomy, biology, and chemistry. This course will also cover: the collection of evidence and search for witnesses, developing and questioning suspects, and protecting the integrity of physical evidence found at the scene and while in transit to a forensic science laboratory. Procedures for the use and control of informants, inquiries keyed to basic leads, and other information-gathering activity and chain of custody procedures will also be reviewed.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisites: Criminal Justice I
    •Credits: 2-3 credits per semester, maximum of 6 credits
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Current Problems, Issues, and Events

Course gives students the opportunity to apply investigative and inquiry techniques to the study of significant problems or issues. Students develop competence in (2) recognizing cause and effect relationships, (2) recognizing fallacies in reasoning and propaganda devices, (3) synthesizing knowledge into useful patterns, (4) stating and testing hypotheses, and (5) generalizing based on evidence. Problems or issues selected will have contemporary historical significance and will be studies from the viewpoint of the social science disciplines. Community service programs and internships within the community may be included.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisites: None
    •Credits: 1 credit. Course may be repeated for credit if the content of the course changes.
    Counts as a Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Digital Application and Responsibility

Course prepares students to use technology in an effective and appropriate manner in school, in a job, or everyday life. Students develop skills related to word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and communications software. Students learn what it means to be a good digital citizen and how to use technology, including social media, responsibly. Students expand their knowledge of how to use digital devices and software to build decision-making and problem-solving skills. Students should be provided with the opportunity to seek industry-recognized digital literacy certifications.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 9 - 12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, 2 semester course
    Counts a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English 9

English 9, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 9
    •Recommended Prerequisites: None
    •Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
    Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English 10

Students read novels, short stories, drama, nonfiction selections, and poetry. Writing instruction centers on improving student mastery of the 6 +1 Traits of Writing (Idea Development, Organization, Voice, Sentence Fluency, Word Choice, Conventions, and Presentation). Finally, language skills, such as vocabulary and grammar study, are addressed in isolation and in conjunction with reading and writing activities. Although the course is organized in contextual units, all aspects of English study are integrated, particularly speaking and writing units, with the reading material. Finally, the curriculum for English 10 serves to prepare students for the Indiana End of Course Assessment.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 10
    •Recommended Prerequisites: English 9
    •Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
    Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

English 11

Representing all American literary periods, the reading selections include short fiction, essays, speeches, poetry, novels, and drama. Course readings not only seek to facilitate growth in critical reading, but they also serve to promote literacy of American culture and history. In addition to reading skills, improvement in writing skills becomes a key component to English 11. Continuing with the 6 +1 Traits of Writing, students focus on research methods, citation via the Modern Language Association (MLA), and argumentation structure. These skills culminate into a research paper in the second semester. Finally, language skills, such as vocabulary and mechanics, are addressed both in isolation and in conjunction with reading and writing activities.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11
    •Recommended Prerequisites: English 10
    •Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester
    Fulfills an English/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Geometry

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Congruency and Similarity; Measurement; Analytic Geometry; Circles; and Polyhedra. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school INCC The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I
    •Credits: A two credit course
    Fulfills the Geometry/Integrated Mathematics II requirement for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas and counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma

Health Careers I

Content includes skills common to specific health career topics such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, public health, an introduction to health care systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Leaderhsip skills developed through HOSA participation are also included. Lab experiences are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student's career objectives.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 2 semesters required, 2-3 credits per semester, maximum of 6 credits.
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Health Wellness Education

Course provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain helathy behaviors. Health education should contribute directly to a student's ability to scucessfully practice behaviors that protect and promote heath and avoid or reduce health risks. Through a variety of instruction strategies, students practice the development of functional health information (essential contepts); determine personal values that support health behaviors; develop group norms that value a health lifestyle; develop the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9 - 12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: 8th grade health education
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 semester, maximum 1 credit
    Fulfills the Health & Wellness requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Physical Science

The intent is to offer a course for the students to learn the physical laws of nature as the second year of science. Topics will include Motion, Newton's Laws, Energy, Electricity, Magnetism, Matter, Atoms, Chemical Bonds, Solutions, Acids, Bases, Salts, and Organic Molecules.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 10-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Passing grade in Algebra I
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum 2 credits
    Counts as a Science credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Physics I

A thorough introduction to general physics, which includes the areas of classical mechanics, heat, wave (SHM, light and sound), electricity and magnetism, and optics. The emphasis is on lab work and problem solving.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11
    •Recommended Prerequisite: A in both semester of Biology and concurrently enrolled in Algebra II
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 semester, maximum 1 credit
    Counts as a Science credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry

Pre-Calculus topics include: polynomial functions, rational and algebraic functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, vectors, conic sections, trigonometry and trigonometric functions, polar graphing, and complex numbers. Pre-Calculus emphasizes concepts and skills that must be mastered prior to enrolling in a calculus course.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 11 & 12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: B- or higher in both semesters of Algebra II
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 semester, maximum 1 credit
    Counts as a math credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Preparing For College and Careers

Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career, and life. The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty-first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values, and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana's College and Career Pathways, in-depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community, simulations, and real life experiences, is recommended.

    •Recommended Grade: 9
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 semester, maximum 1 credit
    Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Physical Education

PE I emphasizes health-related fitness and the development of skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of healthy activity. This course concentrates on skill development and the application of rules and strategies. PE II emphasizes a personal commitment to lifetime activity and fitness for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction. This course stresses achieving and maintaining a health-enhancing level of physical fitness and increased knowledge of fitness concepts through different movement forms.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 semester, maximum 1 credit
    Counts as a physical education credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Spanish

The curriculum is designed to: provide basic knowledge of introductory grammar and its usage, both oral and written; develop conversational abilities; elicit correct Spanish pronunciation by studying the Spanish phonetic system; develop elementary composition skills; and provide insights into many aspects of Central, Latin American, Spanish, and Hispanic American cultures.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum 2 credits
    Counts as a Directed Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Spanish II

Spanish II continues to develop the basic language skills learned in Spanish I. Students are expected to master vocabulary used in everyday situations. Advanced grammatical structures and new vocabulary are introduced to help students develop their conversational skills. The course emphasizes original thinking in the language. Cultural differences and similarities will also be studied.

    •Recommended Grade Level: Grade None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Spanish I
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester,maximum 2 credits
    Counts as a Directed Elective credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Speech

Speech is designed to help students speak and listen more effectively, intelligently, and responsibly. The overall goal of the course is to produce students who can communicate effectively one-on-one, in small groups, or in a large-group setting. Skills taught include interpretive reading, speech etiquette, body motion, voice usage, research, organization of materials, group dynamics, parliamentary procedure, job interviewing, and the art of persuasion.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum 2 credits
    Counts as a English/Language Arts credit for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Technical Business Communication

Technical/Business Communication provides students with the communication and problem-solving skills to function effectively in the workplace. Areas of study include written/oral/visual communication, listening, informational reading, Internet research/analysis, and electronic communication. Concepts addressed will include adapting communication to the situation, purpose, and audience. Students produce documents related to employee handbooks, instructional manuals, employment communication, organizational communication, business reports, and social and professional situations using word processing, presentation, multimedia, and desktop publishing software. Instructional strategies should include team projects, class or small group discussions, case studies or scenarios, community-based projects, technology, and business experiences.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: Computer Applications
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, 2 semester course
    Counts as a Direct Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Themes in Literature

A study of universal themes, such as journey of the hero, the trials of youth, the search for identity, and other themes appropriate to the level and interests of students. The course may be limited to a few important related themes. Students examine representative works in various genres by authors of diverse eras and nationalities and the way themee may be treated differently in the works because of the cultural context. Students anaylse how themese illuminate humanity's struggle to understand the human condition.

    •Recommended Grade Level: 11-12
    •Recommended Prerequisite: English 9, 10 or teacher recommendation
    •Credits: 1 credit
    Fulfills an Enlgish/Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

Urban Affairs

Course examines the history, organization, processes and distinctive aspects of urban affairs. The rise of modern cities and an anlysis of modern urban problems are dealth with in this course. The politics of governing urban areas, including the selection of political leaders and citizen partifipation in the decision-making process, is to be emphasized. Data collection and research skills may be taught in conjunction with the study of this course.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit, 1 semester
    Counts as an Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

U.S. History

United States History is a two-semester course that builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, 2 semester course
    Fulfills a the US History requirement of the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

World History and Civilization

World History and Civilization emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice and process skills of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

    •Recommended Grade Level: None
    •Recommended Prerequisite: None
    •Credits: 1 credit per semester, 2 semester course
    Fulfills a Social Studies requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas